The 1995 Ling-TeX Archives

24th June 1995: TSIPA Version 1.1

Subject: TSIPA Version 1.1
Date: Sat, 24 Jun 1995 04:02:55 +0900
From: FUKUI Rei 

A new version of TSIPA, tsipa-1.1.tar.gz, is released. Although a
complete NFSS support is not yet made, style files are modified so
that there should be no errors when compiled by LaTeX2e. This version
also includes English documentation.

You can get tsipa-1.1.tar.gz from:

    ftp://tooyoo.l.u-tokyo.ac.jp/pub/TeX/tsipa

TSIPA was originally written by three people including me (released on 
25 Dec 1992), but for now I'm the only maintainer for newer versions.

The English documentation was made so hastily that surely it is full
of inadequate English phrasing. But having an imperfect manual is far
better that nothing at all.

I'm now wroking on the following things:

o complete support of NFSS
o slanted and bold (extended) styles
o IPA chart based on 1993 version, as a sample document (it's almost
  done but a few macros are missing for tone marks.) 

ps. Congratulations on the reopening of ling-tex!

FUKUI Rei (fkr@tooyoo.l.u-tokyo.ac.jp)

24th June 1995: TSIPA Version 1.1

Subject: Re: TSIPA Version 1.1 
Date: Sat, 24 Jun 1995 14:43:43 +0900
From: FUKUI Rei 

I've just put ipachart.tar.gz which includes IPA chart of 1993 version
and a new style file on ftp://tooyoo.l.u-tokyo.ac.jp/pub/TeX/tsipa.

In order to compile this chart (`ipa93.tex'), it is necessary to
replace the style file `tsipa.sty' of version 1.1 to the new one
included in the above package.  No changes were made on MF files of
TSIPA 1.1. Only `tsipa.sty' has changed. Have fun!

FUKUI Rei

16th July 1995: Landscape Mode

Date: Sun, 16 Jul 95 15:49:08 -0400
From: meyers@acf2.NYU.EDU (meyers)
Subject: Landscape Mode

Does anyone know how to put a piece of
text in landscape mode using latex?
In particular, I would like to do
this with attribute value matrices.

Adam Meyers
(meyers@acf2.nyu.edu)

17th July 1995: rtf2latex

Date:   Mon, 17 Jul 1995 15:47:07 +0200
From: Martin Haase 
Subject: Re: rtf2latex

Auch ich habe nach so einem Programm fuer OS2 oder DOS gesucht und bin
nicht fuendig geworden. Waere also fuer Hilfe dankbar.
Gruss
Martin Haase

-- 
Dr. Martin Haase           http://hal.cl-ki.uni-osnabrueck.de/~haase/
U Osnabrueck FB 7          e-mail:haase@hal.cl-ki.uni-osnabrueck.de           
DE-49069 Osnabrueck        Tel.: (+49 541) 969-4340 FAX: 969-4256   

18th July 1995: Re: Landscape Mode

From: jayez@divsun.unige.ch
Date: Tue, 18 Jul 1995 09:17:45 +0200
Subject: Re: Landscape Mode

Adam Meyers asks:

>Does anyone know how to put a piece of
>text in landscape mode using latex?
>In particular, I would like to do
>this with attribute value matrices.

Adam Meyers
(meyers@acf2.nyu.edu)

This can be done by combining rotate and boxes. For AVM's, I remember having
done this by declaring the AVM as a box and rotating the box. Declaring
AVM's as boxes is explained in the avm.sty documentation. Rotating uses only 
the standard rotate.sty. Admittedly, this is not very natural.

19th July 1995: Re: rtf2latex

From: Marion Neubauer 
Subject: Re: rtf2latex

On Mon, 17 Jul 1995 F.Heberlein@KU-EICHSTAETT.D400.DE wrote:

> Could somebody please point me to a ftp site where I could
> download an executable file of rtf2latex.
> All the sites I have tried so far store the sourcecode (in C)
> only, which I am unable to compile.
> Thanks,
> Fritz Heberlein
> sla019@ku-eichstaett.de
> 
rtf2latex is a unix program. every unix machine has a c compiler and it 
is necessary to compile it on your platform.
there is a version of rtf -> latex for dos, named rtflatex, which comes 
with executables. the author is d. taupin. you find it on your nearest 
ctan site.

with kind regards
marion

19th July 1995: Re: rtf2latex

Subject: Re: rtf2latex 
Date: Wed, 19 Jul 1995 08:17:57 -0700
From: Emma Pease 

> rtf2latex is a unix program. every unix machine has a c compiler and it 
> is necessary to compile it on your platform.

This isn't as correct anymore.  Many unix platforms now ship without
their c compiler, and you pay extra to get it (or you beg or borrow
the gcc (GNU c compiler) binaries for your platform).  You might also
beg the rtf2latex binaries but info about the platform is needed
(e.g., sparc 5 running solaris 2.4 or pentium machine running linux).

Emma

19th July 1995: Help with epsf!!

Date: Wed, 19 Jul 95 23:09:46 -0400
From: meyers@acf2.NYU.EDU (meyers)
Subject: Help with epsf!!

To a Latex Guru out there,

I am writing a book in latex using lots of .eps files. I am loading them
as follows using epsf.sty.

\begin{figure}
\input{epsf}
\epsfbox{CHAP2.dir/lex-entry-eat.eps}
\caption{Finite Intransitive Lexical Entry for {\it eat\/}}
\label{eat-figure-1}
\end{figure}

It seems as though whenever the total number of eps files exceeds 14
(or perhaps there is a different sort of memory limitation), latex
bombs. I get the following error message:

[29] (/usr/local/lib/texmf/tex/dvips/epsf.tex
 ! No room for a new \read .
 \ch@ck ...\else \errmessage {No room for a new #3}
                                                   \fi 
 l.58 \newread\epsffilein
                             % file to \read
 /usr/local/lib/texmf/tex/dvips/epsf.tex
 
 and the curser is on the line: \newread\epsffilein    % file to \read

Figuring this was a memory limitation local to the Sun Workstation
I was on, I tried it in a different enviornment at NYU and got basically
the same result except a few more details of an error message.

! No room for a new \read .
\ch@ck ...\else \errmessage {No room for a new #3}
                                                  \fi 
\alloc@ ...\advance \count 1#1by\@ne \ch@ck #1#4#2
                                                  \allocationnumber =\count ...
l.58 \newread\epsffilein
                            % file to \read

I tracked down the message to the \newread command which is defined in
plain.tex among other places. The relevant definition seems to be
\outer\def\newread{\alloc@6\read\chardef\sixt@@n} which I do not
really understand. However, I tried redefining \chardef\sixt@@n to
some number larger than 16 and got bad results. I feel like I am
a bit over my head here. 

So the question is: is there such a memory limitation? Is there a way
of getting around this memory limitation? So far using separate files
with include statements does not work and the commands \clearpage and
\pagebreak do not seem to help either.  I would rather not break up
the file into several separate ones and manually reset all page
numbers, file references etc. Is there a reasonable solution? Is this
a problem that is built into latex or into the epsf macro.

I am creating the .eps files from xfig. I basically export xfig file.
There are also a whole host of other formats I can convert the xfig
files into. Would this be a better option?
 
Thanks in advance.
 
Adam Meyers
(meyers@acf2.nyu.edu)

20th July 1995: dvi2rtf?

Date: Thu, 20 Jul 95 13:15:49 EST
From: andaling@fac.anu.edu.au (Avery Andrews)
Subject: dvi2rtf?

On the general subject of (la)tex and rtf, are there any dvi->rtf 
converters?

  Avery.Andrews@anu.edu.au

20th July 1995: Re: Help with epsf!!

Date: Thu, 20 Jul 1995 15:05:29 +0200
From: Dirk Kussin 
Subject: Re: Help with epsf!!

meyers> To a Latex Guru out there, I am writing a book in latex using
meyers> lots of .eps files. I am loading them as follows using
meyers> epsf.sty.

meyers> \begin{figure} \input{epsf}
meyers> \epsfbox{CHAP2.dir/lex-entry-eat.eps} \caption{Finite
meyers> Intransitive Lexical Entry for {\it eat\/}}
meyers> \label{eat-figure-1} \end{figure}

Is it really necessary to input the package epsf each time? I don't
use this package myself but I couldn't imagine that loading it so
often is necessary. On the other hand I don't know if this
matters. Try loading epsf (\input{epsf}) only one time in the
preamble.

[...]

meyers> I am creating the .eps files from xfig. I basically export
meyers> xfig file.  There are also a whole host of other formats I can
meyers> convert the xfig files into. Would this be a better option?
 
I'm using xfig too and convert all files to ps- or eps-format. But I'm
using the LaTeX-package ``epsfig'', which is a standard package in the
LaTeX2e distribution (lies in the subdirectory packages/graphics). I
haven't any problems with it.

Example:

\documentclass{article}

\usepackage[dvips]{epsfig} %dvips=the DVItoPS driver I use

\begin{document}

\centerline{\psfig{figure=../Text/Koecher5.ps,height=36ex}}
%You can also use \epsfig instead of \psfig

\end{document}

epsfig is described in the LaTeX Companion. There are other features
like rotating. You can also use it within the \figure environment with
the \caption command.

meyers> Adam Meyers (meyers@acf2.nyu.edu)

Dirk

-- 
Dirk Kussin                            dirk@uni-paderborn.de     
Fachbereich 17 Mathematik-Informatik   Raum D2.201               
Universitšt-GH Paderborn               Tel. (+49) (5251) 60-3067 
D-33095 Paderborn ----------------------------------------------

20th July 1995: Re: Help with epsf!!

Date: Thu, 20 Jul 1995 15:33:15 +0200
From: Bruno Tersago 
To: dirk@uni-paderborn.de
Subject: Re: Help with epsf!!

Try using epsf.sty. I have used it a few times in LaTeX (not
LaTeX2e) and the only thing I had to do was putting the following
sequence in the input file

\leavevmode
\epsfxsize=5cm  %%: how big do you want the image to be
\epsffile[0 0 54 69]{.eps} %%: between [] you put the
                                     %%measures of the bounding 
                                     %%box (which you can find in
                                     %%the .eps file). Normally
                                     %%there should be no
                                     %%restrictions on the number
                                     %%of .eps files you want to
                                     %%include. 

Hope this helps.

-- Bruno

*************************************************************************
Bruno Tersago                                       Tel:  +32-16-32 50 88
Centre for Computational                            Fax:  +32-16-32 50 98
    Linguistics      
Maria-Theresiastraat, 21         E-mail: Bruno.Tersago@ccl.kuleuven.ac.be
B-3000 Leuven (Belgium)        URL: http://www.ccl.kuleuven.ac.be/~bruno/
**************************************************************************

20th July 1995: update of the ling-mac.tex file coming

From: cthiele@ccs.carleton.ca (Christina Thiele)
Subject: update of the ling-mac.tex file coming
Date: Thu, 20 Jul 95 16:36:50 EDT

For many of you, the filename ling-mac.tex will mean little ... 

It's a file which began about 2 years ago, a kind of quick reference
listing of macros and style files which exist in various places for
the purpose of typesetting linguistics material with (La)TeX. The last
page includes shorts notes on various archives which store some or all
of these files ... and some files which we don't have listed here, so
if anyone wants to do a bit of digging help update this little
inventory of linguistics macros, then please get in touch with me.

The file was originally started by myself, then maintained by a
ling-tex subscriber, Sunny Au; the file will now be maintained by the
new (but still pretty inactive -- just too much to do right now!)
Technical Working Group (TWG) for TeX and Linguistics, which I chair.

The file is for macros and style files only. We're discussing the
usefulness of having a separate but similar list for fonts ... fonts
can be a ... well ... a rather large field to cover, if you want to
really go hog-wild and include everything interesting ;-) 

But for now I'm just posting the macros file. It's not a style file
itself but an inventory, done in ordinary plain _old_ LaTeX ...

Christina

20th July 1995: Special symbols used in linguist's and humanist's editions

From: KNAPPEN@VKPMZD.kph.Uni-Mainz.DE
Date: Thu, 20 Jul 1995 23:20:12 +0100
Subject: Special symbols used in linguist's and humanist's editions

Here is a question to the readers of ling-tex:

I'm looking for a list of symbols used in humanist's editions, which aren't 
provided by the standard TeX text fonts. I'm aware of angular brackets 
(TeX's $\langle$ and $\rangle$), but there are probably more. 

--J"org Knappen
Coordinator of the dc font working group

20th July 1995: J"org's query about `special symbols'

From: cthiele@ccs.carleton.ca (Christina Thiele)
Subject: J"org's query about `special symbols' 
Date: Thu, 20 Jul 95 17:39:20 EDT

Hi, J"org ... 

What kind of symbols did you have in mind? Your message only mentions
< > ... what else do you mean? 

For linguistics? Well, we like arrows a lot ;-)

There are super/subscripts of course, both letters and digits.

There are bars over the tops of X, for example, but it's all a bit
unsystematic/unstandardised, since some word processing programs can't
do those bars so authors opt for ... euh ... quick, what's X-bar
theory also shown as ... uh ... oh, yeah, a \prime ... although
usually smaller than $\prime$ gets you in math mode. 

So the technology seems at times to dictate what notation to use, even
though with TeX, well, we can do anything ... ;-) 

Other symbols? Sounds like a good item to throw back and forth over
the list for a few days, no?

Ch.

21st July 1995: Re: Special symbols used in linguist's and humanist's editions

From: John Nerbonne 
Subject: Re: Special symbols used in linguist's and humanist's editions
Date: Fri, 21 Jul 1995 09:21:21 +0200 (METDST)

I'm not sure of all that Joerg Knappen is after under "fonts" for
humanists, but for linguistics it ought to include symbols used in
linguistic analysis such as the IPA, grammar specification (see texts
on math. linguistics, e.g. Hopcroft & Ullman, or Wall, Partee & ter
Meulen), logic used in semantics (which introduces not only \forall,
etc., but lots of stuff from set theory and discrete math).  I'm
deliberately leaving out the stuff that's bigger than the usual
characters, like trees (with lots of annotations), dependency graphs,
autosegmental tiers, avm's, ... (and probably inadvertently lots more).

As far as nonlinguistic stuff goes, I think the big issue is genuine
multilinguality--e.g., being able to code texts in several renderings
simultaneously, e.g., a traditional orthography juxtaposed to a modern
one accompanied by a systematic linguistic representation (say,
phonemic).  You are further confronted with the problems of
multilingual texts in scholarly writing, as when a book in a western
language discusses Eastern Orthodox theology.  Then you might well
have quotations of Hebrew within Russian within French, etc.  Or maybe
a paper in English on Mayan hieroglyphics, which uses glosses with
modern Mayan cognates from Kek'chi or Yucatec, accompanied by English
and Spanish translations.  This suggests that what humanists
ultimately need is _all_ the writing systems, and the ability to
combine them.  One needn't think of these as a "font" problems, except
that they suggest how freely font declarations must be made, and
because they remind one of subtleties such as the left-right
orientation of the line.

Humanists who work on poetry and music (lyrics) also tear their hair
about formatting.

The forthcoming issue of Computing and the Humanities on TEI contains
interesting stuff.

--John N.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

John Nerbonne, Alfa Informatica                   nerbonne@let.rug.nl
University of Groningen                           Tel. (31) +50 635 815
P.O. Box 716                                      Fax           634 900
Oude Kijk in 't Jatstraat 26
NL-9700 AS GRONINGEN                    http://www.let.rug.nl/~nerbonne
The Netherlands

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

25th July 1995: Re: Special symbols used in linguist's and humanist's editions

From: KNAPPEN@VKPMZD.kph.Uni-Mainz.DE
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 1995 14:50:29 +0100
Subject: Re: Special symbols used in linguist's and humanist's editions

Christina,

I am just looking for additional characters, which we have named text 
symbols. Text symbols are characters which are not mathematical in nature 
and which should agree in size and style to the text font. They aren't 
dingbats nor foreign alphabets either.

The paradigmatic examples are the footnote symbols (asterisk, dagger, 
ddager, pilcrow, and section), other examples are the currency symbols.

At the moment, I'm interested in quick answers, but there is space left to 
add more text symbols to the text companion fonts later.

Yours,
J"org Knappen.

25th July 1995: Special Symbols

From: "Michael Job" 
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 95 15:07:51 +0200
Subject: Special Symbols

If J"org is looking for symbols used in textual criticism such as in 
Classical Philology, there are many. An overview is presented by 

    Otto Luschnat: Zur Editionstechnik der klassischen Philologen.
    In: Wissenschaftliche Annalen zur Verbreitung neuer 
    Forschungsergebnisse, hsg. von der Deutschen Akademie der
    Wissenschaften zu Berlin, 1. Jahrgang, Heft 6, September 1952,
    pp.362-375.

There is a synoptical table on p. 372 with the different types of 
bracketing etc.

Cheers,
Mike Job

=========================
job@mailer.uni-marburg.de
=========================

26th July 1995: Special symbols

From: "Michael Job" 
Date: Wed, 26 Jul 95 12:39:18 +0200
Subject: Special symbols

On Tue, 25 Jul 95 10:10:17 EDT, Joseph Raben wrote:

>Could you please explain a little more about the special symbols you refer
>to in your bibliographic reference? In particular, are they relevant to nat-
>ural language processing?
>
>Joseph Raben
>

The symbols used in my bibliographic reference have been designed for 
textual criticism, i.e., for rendering in print the appearance (often 
defective) of text in old manuscripts as well as the editor's attempts at 
reconstruction of the original make-up of the text. There are different 
kinds of brackets, most of which will cause no typographical problems for 
TeX, such as square brackets, bold square brackets, two bold square 
brackets, angled brackets, braces, hooks (i.e., the upper half of square 
brackets), daggers, and asterisks which are not raised (the way they 
usually are), but stand in place of the lower case letters; finally dots 
under a letter.

Mike Job

=========================
job@mailer.uni-marburg.de
=========================

26th July 1995: Re: Special Symbols

From: KNAPPEN@VKPMZD.kph.Uni-Mainz.DE
Date: Wed, 26 Jul 1995 16:38:13 +0100
Subject: Re: Special Symbols

Thank you very much. I located the reference at our university
library and this is exactly the kind of symbols I'm looking for.
I consider the upper half square brackets as a potential addition to the tc 
text symbol fonts (they can be faked with $\ceil$ and $@rceil$, but the 
latter don't look exactly the same).

Yours, J"org Knappen.

10th August 1995: dotless j in Times Roman (Adobe)

From: cthiele@ccs.carleton.ca (Christina Thiele)
Subject: dotless j in Times Roman (Adobe)
Date: Thu, 10 Aug 95 19:20:42 EDT

I was just checking out some corrections in a file and noticed that \j
wasn't giving me a dotless j ... 

I'm using the Adobe Times Roman font on my LJ 4M, using LaTeX, using
the stuff from times.sty and psfonts.sty, using dvips ...

So ... is there a dotless j in all of this that I could access?

And this now leads me to ask ... (and wonder, in case somewhere else
in this book I have it) ... what about the dotless i?

And are there other characters that we take for granted in the cm
fonts which aren't around in a ps font or which perhaps have to be
specially coded in order to access ...

Anyone with helpful advice and explanations -- please post! Phonetic
transcriptions without dotless i's and j's just aren't gonna work ;-) 

Thanks.

Christina

11th August 1995: Re: dotless j in Times Roman (Adobe)

From: Jim Blevins 
Date: Thu, 11 Aug 94 11:36:53 +0800
Subject: Re: dotless j in Times Roman (Adobe)

More generally, does Adobe have an IPA font collection for any
platform?

-Jim
---
Jim Blevins                                     jblevins@uniwa.uwa.edu.au
Centre for Linguistics                  phone: +61-9-380-2866
University of Western Australia fax:   +61-9-380-1154
Nedlands, W.A. 6009

11th August 1995: Re: dotless j in Times Roman (Adobe)

From: Dag Langmyhr 
Date: Fri, 11 Aug 1995 07:45:23 GMT
Subject: Re: dotless j in Times Roman (Adobe)

-> I was just checking out some corrections in a file and noticed that \j
-> wasn't giving me a dotless j ... 
-> 
-> I'm using the Adobe Times Roman font on my LJ 4M, using LaTeX, using
-> the stuff from times.sty and psfonts.sty, using dvips ...
-> 
-> So ... is there a dotless j in all of this that I could access?

No. There is no dotless j in the Adobe fonts and there is no place for
it in the standard Adobe encoding.

You can, however, fake a dotless j with some fancy PostScript coding,
but it is not trivial.

-> And this now leads me to ask ... (and wonder, in case somewhere else
-> in this book I have it) ... what about the dotless i?

The dotless i exists.

-> And are there other characters that we take for granted in the cm
-> fonts which aren't around in a ps font or which perhaps have to be
-> specially coded in order to access ...

The following cm characters are missing from the Adobe fonts:

	Uppercase greek Gamma, Delta, Theta, Lambda, Xi, Pi, 
			Sigma, Upsilon, Phi, Psi and Omega.
	Dotless j
	The skewed - used to to cross the L and l in Polish
		(On the other hand, l-slash and L-slash exist as
		 letters in the Adobe fonts.)

Compared to the dc/ec character set (the Cork encoding), the following
characters are missing:

	Dotless j
	Small 0 used to extend % to "per thousand", "per ten
		thousand", etc. 
		(On the other hand, "per thousand" exists.)
	Letters Ng and ng used in Lappish.

	(Also, the Icelandic and Old English letters Eth, eth, Thorn
	 and thorn exist in all major Adobe fonts, but have no place
	 in the Adobe encoding; the font must be reencoded to access
	 these letters.)

-> Anyone with helpful advice and explanations -- please post! Phonetic
-> transcriptions without dotless i's and j's just aren't gonna work ;-) 
-> 
-> Thanks.
-> 
-> Christina

						Dag Langmyhr

11th August 1995: Re: Adobe IPA fonts

Date: Fri, 11 Aug 1995 13:15:12 -0700
From: Christopher Manning 
Subject: Re: Adobe IPA fonts

Jim Blevins writes:
 > More generally, does Adobe have an IPA font collection for any =
 > platform?

Yes, there are Adobe Type 1 and 3 ("Postscript") IPA fonts, both
commercially available ones (Times Roman, Stone Sans Serif and Stone Serif
from Adobe, and others from Ecological Linguistics) and freely available
ones from SIL.

Q: I haven't actually used any of the commercial ones, and would be
interested in any opinions/samples for a summary of available IPA fonts
that I'm trying (at a snail's pace) to produce for the working group on TeX
and Linguistics.

Chris.

5th September 1995: Capital Thorn?

From: Jim Blevins 
Date: Tue,  5 Sep 95 13:27:27 +0800
Subject: Capital Thorn?

Can someone point me to a TeX font family with a capital thorn
(roman and italic).

Thanks,

-Jim---
Jim Blevins                             jblevins@uniwa.uwa.edu.au
Centre for Linguistics                  phone: +61-9-380-2866
University of Western Australia         fax:   +61-9-380-1154
Nedlands, W.A. 6009

5th September 1995: Re: Capital Thorn?

From: cthiele@ccs.carleton.ca (Christina Thiele)
Subject: Re: Capital Thorn?
Date: Tue, 5 Sep 95 18:06:36 EDT

Jim Blevins writes:
> 
> Can someone point me to a TeX font family with a capital thorn =
> (roman and italic).
> 
> Thanks,
> 
> -Jim---
> Jim Blevins                             jblevins@uniwa.uwa.edu.au
> Centre for Linguistics                  phone: +61-9-380-2866
> University of Western Australia         fax:   +61-9-380-1154
> Nedlands, W.A. 6009=
> 


Hi there! 

>From the article which was published in TTN 1,4:3--10, I see that
there are cap thorns (and eths, if you want!) available in the DC
fonts. Which means that if you get the complete set of DC fonts,
that'll provide you with the roman, italic, bold, etc. styles you
need. Or just pick up the specific styles/sizes you need.

If you don't have a copy of TTN, you can pick it up from CTAN (ftp to
ftp.shsu.edu or to ftp.tex.ac.uk or to ftp.dante.de -- your choice) in

      tex-archive/digests/ttn/ttn1n4.***. 

Note that the .tex file requires the DC fonts to have been set up in
order to be run, but you can still pick it up and read the text. There
is a ttn1n4.hlp file there as well, specially for this issue. 

Of course, a PostScript file would be the ideal answer ... I've been
meaning to put .ps versions of all the issues up on CTAN but haven't
gotten around to it ... sorry ;-(


Anyways, about the fonts ... you'll find what you need if you go to
CTAN and go to

   tex-archive/fonts/dc/

which has tfm/, mf/ and ps-type1/ subdirectories with everything you'd
need to get things set up. 

I think there are enough people on this list who have extensive
experience with the DC fonts, so if you run into trouble, I'm sure
you'll get the assistance you need. I don't have the fonts installed
here on my machine ... another thing I've not gotten around to ... ;-(

Hope this solves your Thorn-y problem ... ;-) 

Ch.

6th September 1995: Re: Capital Thorn?

From: Jim Blevins 
Date: Wed,  6 Sep 95 16:51:47 +0800
Subject: Re: Capital Thorn?

Christina,

Thanks for the quick and helpful reply; the DC fonts seem to be what I want, tho
ugh running mf on the dcr.mf file from ftp.tex.ac.uk produces screenfulls of err
ors and warnings, terminating in:

! Equation cannot be performed (numeric=boolean).
 
                   ;
l.83 math_fitting:=false;
                         
>> generate.dxroman
! Isolated expression.
 
                   ;
l.86 endinput;
              
)
*
! Emergency stop.

I would be grateful for pointers to alternative mf sources or other solutions.

-Jim

6th September 1995: Re: Capital Thorn?

From: tim@maths.tcd.ie
Subject: Re: Capital Thorn?
Date: Wed, 6 Sep 1995 16:35:39 +0100 (BST)

> 
> Thanks for the quick and helpful reply; the DC fonts seem to be =
> what I want, though running mf on the dcr.mf file from =
> ftp.tex.ac.uk produces screenfulls of errors and warnings, 

You are not meant to do this.

You are meant to start by creating all the "real" mf files 
like dcr10.mf, etc, by "latex dcstedt",
using the file dcstedt.tex in the .../fonts/dc/mf directory.

9th September: Re: Capital Thorn?

From: KNAPPEN@VKPMZD.kph.Uni-Mainz.DE
Date: Sat, 09 Sep 1995 15:53:12 +0100
Subject: Re: Capital Thorn?

First of all, a new release of the dc fonts is going to be placed to the 
CTAN archives today, and will be available for the general public in the 
beginning of the next week. Just hold your breath before fetching them...

Second, you should run 
$ tex dcstdedt
first in order to get the mf input files. Note, that I have changed the 
naming policy, dcr10 becomes dcr1000 (the design size is now measured in 
centipoints).

Third, LaTeX2e offers support for the dc fonts with
\usepackage[T1]{fontenc}
For the new version I'll provide replacement .fd files.
 
--J"org Knappen

Coordinating the development of dc fonts

16th September 1995: CTAN upload: dc-fonts 1.2

From: cthiele@ccs.carleton.ca (Christina Thiele)
Subject: CTAN upload: dc-fonts 1.2 (fwd)
Date: Sat, 16 Sep 95 9:05:14 EDT

The DC fonts have now been updated! They were the topic of
conversation a week or so ago on this list.

Below is a message posted by Jorg Knappen to the Metafont list earlier
this week.

Ch.

============================================================

KNAPPEN@VKPMZD.kph.Uni-Mainz.DE writes:
> From metafont-request@ens.fr  Fri Sep 15 06:16:39 1995
> Date: Tue, 12 Sep 1995 21:09:27 +0100
> From: KNAPPEN@VKPMZD.kph.Uni-Mainz.DE
> Subject: CTAN upload: dc-fonts 1.2
> 
> The version 1.2 of the Cork encoded dc fonts is now available from the CTAN 
> sites and will propagate to its mirrors soon.
> 
> The release includes the following:
> 
> * Many bugfixes, including ?` and !`
> * The polish special letters from plfonts by Jackowsky and Rycko
> * Overall improved accents
> * A text companion font containing 105 extra symbols
> 
> The sources and some documentation are placed in 
> 
> tex-archive/fonts/dc/mf
> 
> fd-Files for LaTeX can be found in
> 
> tex-archive/fonts/dc/fd
> 
> There are also starter files for mf in directory ready-mf/ and tfm files in 
> directory tfm/. You need to rebuild your LaTeX2e format with the new 
> fd-files included to use the new version of the dcfonts, since all font 
> names have changed.
> 
> --J"org Knappen
> 
> P.S. dc-fonts v 1.1 are withdrawn, except for the PostScript versions.
> 
> P.P.S. You can find some documentation of the new release in the EuroTeX95
> proceedings.

13th October 1995: Bib style for linguistics

Date: Fri, 13 Oct 1995 15:22:21 +0100
From: Dirk Kussin 
Subject: Bib style for linguistics

Anyone who knows a good bibliography (BibTeX) style for linguistical
texts? I would like to have the following features:

1.) Names of authors in small caps.

2.) The edition as pre-index of the year (in the form 3
                                                       1987 )
    this should appear at least in the citation, and only if the
    edition is not the first.

3.) Working together with LaTeX2e (if it matters).

Any hints where I can get such a style (or others which have similar
features) and suggestions are welcome. Also hints how to hack an
appropriate style to get feature 2.) are welcome.

I think the problem is that there never is the optimal style which is
consistent in all cases. In particular, if the literature is in
different languages there is the problem with, for example
(english/german), page/Seite, editor/Herausgeber, edition/Auflage, and
so on. I think, the only possibilty in those cases is to make the
`final hack', when the work is ready. But this is very
unsatisfying. Anyone who knows if there is a multilingual environment
controlling those problems (perhaps the babel package?)?

Thanks in advance

Dirk

-- 
Dirk Kussin                            dirk@uni-paderborn.de     
Fachbereich 17 Mathematik-Informatik   Raum D2.323
Universitšt-GH Paderborn               Tel. (+49) (5251) 60-2636
D-33095 Paderborn ----------------------------------------------

13th October 1995: Re: Bib style for linguistics

Date: Mon, 16 Oct 1995 10:15:55 +0100 (MET)
From: "Stud. Assis. of Wietske Vonk" 
Subject: Re: Bib style for linguistics

On Fri, 13 Oct 1995, Dirk Kussin wrote:

> Anyone who knows a good bibliography (BibTeX) style for linguistical
> texts? I would like to have the following features:
>
> 1.) Names of authors in small caps.
>
> 2.) The edition as pre-index of the year (in the form 3
>                                                        1987 )
>     this should appear at least in the citation, and only if the
>     edition is not the first.

this is hard to do, especially in the citations. I don't know any style 
that uses this kind of citation.

> 
> 3.) Working together with LaTeX2e (if it matters).
> 
> Any hints where I can get such a style (or others which have similar
> features) and suggestions are welcome. Also hints how to hack an
> appropriate style to get feature 2.) are welcome.
Very usable is the `merlin' package. You can customize everything very 
easy, and there is even language support. I think that you have to look 
on CTAN for the package.

> I think the problem is that there never is the optimal style which is
> consistent in all cases. In particular, if the literature is in
> different languages there is the problem with, for example
> (english/german), page/Seite, editor/Herausgeber, edition/Auflage, and
> so on. I think, the only possibilty in those cases is to make the
> `final hack', when the work is ready. But this is very
> unsatisfying. Anyone who knows if there is a multilingual environment
> controlling those problems (perhaps the babel package?)?

Problems with this, is the use of more than one language in one document.
 
I don't know if there is a consistent way of dealing with the problems 
you mention.

bye,
Marc
lezen@mpi.nl

> 
> Thanks in advance
> 
> Dirk
> 
> -- 
> Dirk Kussin                            dirk@uni-paderborn.de     
> Fachbereich 17 Mathematik-Informatik   Raum D2.323
> Universit=E4t-GH Paderborn               Tel. (+49) (5251) 60-2636
> D-33095 Paderborn ----------------------------------------------

16th October 1995: Re: Bib style for linguistics

Date: Mon, 16 Oct 95 09:11 PDT
Subject: Re: Bib style for linguistics
From: Don.Colton@cse.ogi.edu

   > Anyone who knows a good bibliography (BibTeX) style for linguistical
   > texts? I would like to have the following features:

i modified a .bst file recently to customize the citations.  (we
wanted to cite like this: Able, Baker, et al, (1995).)  if you are
game to look at the .bst files, you can do all the things you mention.
the .bst approach is very powerful (see also, difficult).  if you do
not find a ready-made solution, i would be happy to talk you through
modifying another style to fit your needs.

to put author in small caps, probably a 1-line change.

to put edition by the year, probably a 3-line change.

                Don Colton   http://www.cse.ogi.edu/~ldcolton/
       ___e     year-round bicycle commuter and 3rd yr PhD student
     _`\ <;     at the Center for Spoken Language Understanding
____(_)/_(_)____Oregon Graduate Institute of Science & Technology

16th October 1995: Re: Bibstyle for linguistics

From: cthiele@ccs.carleton.ca (Christina Thiele)
Subject: Re: Bib style for linguistics
Date: Mon, 16 Oct 95 13:41:09 EDT

Don.Colton@CSE.OGI.EDU writes:
> 
> 
>    > Anyone who knows a good bibliography (BibTeX) style for linguistical
>    > texts? I would like to have the following features:
> 
> i modified a .bst file recently to customize the citations.  (we
> wanted to cite like this: Able, Baker, et al, (1995).)  if you are
> game to look at the .bst files, you can do all the things you mention.
> the .bst approach is very powerful (see also, difficult).  if you do
> not find a ready-made solution, i would be happy to talk you through
> modifying another style to fit your needs.
> 
> to put author in small caps, probably a 1-line change.
> 
> to put edition by the year, probably a 3-line change.

In light of these recent exchanges about BiBTeX style files and
linguistics, I'd like to point out that currently, the ling-mac.tex
file (the one that lists styles files for use with linguistics)
includes only one reference to a .bst file:

   \item [lsalike.sty, lsalike.bst:]
         Daniel S. Jurafsky, UC Berkeley.

         ``{\em lsalike} style file for bibtex.
           It implements a bibliography format which
           is very close to the LSA style sheet and
           resembles the journal Language.
           Among its advantages are that it does the lovely
           dashed-lines-for-repeated-bib-entries that
           makes Language bibliographies so easy to read,
           and it also makes citations of the form Chomsky (1965:134)
           very easy.''
 
         ftp.icsi.berkeley.edu: {\tt pub/ai/jurafsky}
 

As well, directly from Stanford's CSLI (ftp to csli.stanford.edu) the
following files can be found in /pub/TeXfiles:

   bibtex.abbrev
   bibtex.el
   cslibib.sty.Z
   cslibib.bst.Z


And perhaps there are others out there? Either ones in progress, as
we've been seeing mentioned lately on this list, or perhaps already in
use.

So ... if anyone has a BiBTeX style file for either their own
linguistics purposes, or one that's perhaps set up for a specific
journal, and they'd like to ... uh ... kind of offer it up for public
consumption -- I'd be more than happy to add it to the next update of
lingmac.sty (which has otherwise seen no changes since last posted a
few months ago). 

If you'd like to have your .bst file tested first, then please
consider this list a resource: lots of people here probably have just
the article to give it a good run-through ;-) Just post a message and
I'm sure some testers will get in touch with you.

If you're unfamilar with the ling-mac.tex list of macros, I believe
you can find the file at your nearest CTAN site under:

       tex-archive/info/ling-mac.tex

The main CTAN sites are:

       ftp.dante.de  (Germany)      /tex-archive
       ftp.shsu.edu  (Texas, USA)   /tex-archive
       ftp.tex.ac.uk (England)      /tex-archive


Christina
Chair, TWG on TeX and Linguistics
       [a rather dormant TWG at the moment ... I know ... ;-( ]

14th November 1995: Conf. announcement: CLS 32

Occasionally I receive announcements about upcoming events -- and I'm
sure many subscribers to this list receive even more!

Is it useful/interesting to re-post such announcements here, or do
people prefer to see only TeX-related linguistics issues on this list? 

Ch.

==============================================

Chicago Linguistic Society writes:
> From cls@sapir.uchicago.edu  Sat Nov 11 14:54:29 1995
> Date: Sat, 11 Nov 95 13:52:26 CST
> From: Chicago Linguistic Society 
> Message-Id: <9511111952.AA06571@sapir.uchicago.edu>
> To: cls@sapir.uchicago.edu
> Subject: CLS 32
> 
>                      C A L L   F O R   P A P E R S
>                      _____________________________
> 
> 
>                                 The
> 
>                       CHICAGO LINGUISTIC SOCIETY
>  
>                             announces its 
> 
>                       Thirty-second Annual Meeting
> 
>                               to be held
> 
>                        April 11, 12, and 13, 1996
> 
>                      ______________________________
> 
> 
>                       GENERAL SESSION, APRIL 11-12
> 
>             We invite original, unpublished work on any topic 
>                      of general linguistic interest.
> 
>                            INVITED SPEAKERS
>                   Alice Harris, Vanderbilt University
>                Masayoshi Shibatani, UCLA/Kobe University
> 
>                                   *
>                                   *
> 
>                        PARASESSION, APRIL 12-13 
> 
>                  IS LINGUISTICS AN EMPIRICAL SCIENCE?
>                     THEORY AND DATA IN LINGUISTICS
> 
> Theory and data are inextricably intertwined in all fields of research.
> What counts as evidence, and what counts as counterevidence?  We invite
> original, unpublished work on the relative roles of theory and data in
> linguistic argumentation, focusing on such issues as:
> 
>    > The validity of external evidence
>    > The significance of historical evidence in synchronic grammar
>    > How decisions about notation affect both theory and data
>    > The importance of linguistic diversity for universal claims
>    > Conflicting definitions of language
>    > New implications from ancient and non-Western linguistics
>    > The relation of linguistic methods to those in other disciplines
> 
>                           INVITED SPEAKERS
>                  Hans Aarsleff, Princeton University
>                 Michael Krauss, University of Alaska
>               William Labov, University of Pennsylvania
>                 James McCawley, University of Chicago
>            Joseph Paul Stemberger, University of Minnesota
> 
>                             ABSTRACTS
> 
> Please submit ten copies of a one-page, 500-word, anonymous
> abstract (for a 25-minute paper), along with a 3x5" card with your
> name, affiliation, address, phone number, e-mail address, title of
> paper, and indication of whether the paper in intended for the main
> session or the parasession.  If the paper is intended for the main
> session, please specify its subject matter (e.g. Phonetics/Phonology,
> Syntax/Semantics, Historical Linguistics, Discourse Analysis,
> Morphology, etc.)
> 
> The abstract should be as specific as possible, and it should clearly
> indicate the data covered, outline the arguments presented, and inclusde
> any broader implications of the work.  One page of data and/or references
> may be appended, if necessary.  An individual may present at most one
> single and one co-authored paper.  Authors whose abstracts are accepted
> agree to submit for publication a camera-ready copy of their paper by 
> May 15, 1996.
> 
> Deadline for receipt of abstracts is January 31, 1996.  Send abstracts to:
> 
>      Chicago Linguistic Society
>      1010 East 59th street
>      Chicago, Illinois 60637
>      (312)702-8529
> 
> Abstracts sent via e-mail will not be considered, but further information
> may be obtained from cls@sapir.uchicago.edu.
> 
> "The data do not speak for themselves.  I have been in rooms with data 
>  and listened very carefully.  They never said a word."
> 
>                                                --Milford Wolpoff (1975)
> 
> Persons with disabilities who may require assistance, please contact 
> Lisa McNair at 312/288-3556 or cls@sapir.uchicago.edu.

12th December 1995: 1 1/2 spacing

Hello!

My girlfriend is going on to write her thesis with LaTeX (to be
precise: LaTeX2e) using (not double spacing but) 1 1/2 spacing (which
is demanded by the university), using

\renewcommand{\baselinestretch}{1.24}  (according to 12pt).

The PROBLEM is that she would like to give cited examples, citations and
so on *normal* spaced (which seems to be traditional). But we do not
know if it is possible to reset \baselinestretch and how to do it.

Anyone who has expirience with this problem? Thanks in advance

Dirk

-- 
Dirk Kussin                            dirk@uni-paderborn.de     
Fachbereich 17 Mathematik-Informatik   Raum D2.323
Universitšt-GH Paderborn               Tel. (+49) (5251) 60-2636
D-33095 Paderborn ----------------------------------------------

12th December 1995: Re: 1 1/2 spacing

Dirk Kussin writes:
> 
> 
> Hello!
> 
> My girlfriend is going on to write her thesis with LaTeX (to be
> precise: LaTeX2e) using (not double spacing but) 1 1/2 spacing (which
> is demanded by the university), using
> 
> \renewcommand{\baselinestretch}{1.24}  (according to 12pt).
> 
> The PROBLEM is that she would like to give cited examples, citations and
> so on *normal* spaced (which seems to be traditional). But we do not
> know if it is possible to reset \baselinestretch and how to do it.
> 
> Anyone who has expirience with this problem? Thanks in advance
> 
> Dirk
> 
> -- 
> Dirk Kussin                            dirk@uni-paderborn.de     
> Fachbereich 17 Mathematik-Informatik   Raum D2.323
> Universitšt-GH Paderborn               Tel. (+49) (5251) 60-2636
> D-33095 Paderborn ----------------------------------------------
> 


Hi, Dirk! Good to see you back in LaTeX business ;-) 

This sort of query usually elicits a bunch of responses, including
the ever-enthralling discussions on how line-and-a-half spacing has no
business in a typeset document and all that ;-)

But the facts are that university departments, rather than
typographers, set the rules for theses, so we learn to grin and bear
it ... 

Some solutions I would investigate ... 

a. check if there are any thesis style files on CTAN which *might*
   deal with this vertical spacing business *and* which seem to have
   fairly similar document specs for your girlfriend's university.

   If there is such a critter, then modify it accordingly and you're
   home free.

b. make your own style, and redefine all the environments that will 
   *not* be done in line-and-a-half ... which is why I would first
   check out CTAN ;-)

c. post a similar query to comp.text.tex, as well as some of the 
   European user group lists

I'm sure there are style files already out there which would be a good
basis to start from. 

Since there's been no great rush to answer so far (already Christmas
holidays?), perhaps these vague ideas will help get things started.
And good luck on the thesis writing!

Ch.

12th December 1995: Re: 1 1/2 spacing

Dirk and Christina,

The obvious place to start is with doublespace.sty - notwithstanding the
name, it allows you to have arbitrary line spacing by giving a simple
command: \setstretch{1.5}.

It also illustrates redefining certain environments to be single spaced:
 look for the (re)definition of \@xfloat.  In practice, though, you may
just want to define your own environments like singlequote and have it
do a singlespace environment inside a quote environment.

Chris

13th December 1995: Re: 1 1/2 spacing

Chris> Dirk and Christina, The obvious place to start is with
Chris> doublespace.sty - notwithstanding the name, it allows you to
Chris> have arbitrary line spacing by giving a simple command:
Chris> \setstretch{1.5}.

Chris> It also illustrates redefining certain environments to be
Chris> single spaced: look for the (re)definition of \@xfloat.  In
Chris> practice, though, you may just want to define your own
Chris> environments like singlequote and have it do a singlespace
Chris> environment inside a quote environment.

Yes, I now have that style and a short test has shown that it works
(in particular I mean the singlespace environment). I hope that there
are no difficulties when writing the thesis, which would be a far more
complex document with different languages. I will test it in a few
days under harder conditions.

By the way: 1.5 and 2 are the `wrong' factors. If using 12pt, 1.5
spacing corresponds to the factor 1.24, as described in the book
`LaTeX Companion' by Goossens, Mittelbach, Samarin; Addison-Wesley
(see under \baselinestretch):

             10pt  11pt  12pt
------------------------------
1 1/2        1.25  1.21  1.24
double       1.67  1.62  1.66

In the book it is also explained why this is so.

Thank you very much for your hints!
 Dirk

13th December 1995: Type 1 Hebrew fonts

From: Michael Covington 
Subject: Type 1 Hebrew fonts

A colleague is looking for a good Type 1 font for ancient Hebrew, including
vowels and accents, as cheap as possible.  What's out there?  Can TeX fonts
easily be converted to Type 1?  I don't think TeX is the software he'll
be using.

(I'm aware of TeX-XeT and the impressive article in TUGboat a few months
ago about typesetting the Bible in Hebrew.  But I don't have the article
handy at the moment.)

-- 
Michael A. Covington                http://www.ai.uga.edu/faculty/covington/
Artificial Intelligence Center                                           <><
The University of Georgia                Unless specifically indicated, I am
Athens, GA 30602-7415 U.S.A.                not speaking for the University.

14th December 1995: STY files

From: Belanger Marc Andre 
Subject: STY files

Is there any site where I could get .sty files for various linguistic 
journals (eg, Language, Word, LI, etc.)?

Thank you.

Marc.

Last updated 20th February 1997 by Dag Langmyhr.